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What You Need to Know About Understanding Movies (14th Edition) book pdf


Understanding Movies (14th Edition) book pdf




Are you interested in learning more about the art and craft of filmmaking? Do you want to explore the language and techniques of cinema and how they create meaning and emotion for audiences? If so, you might want to check out Understanding Movies, a popular textbook that provides an engaging and accessible introduction to film.




Understanding Movies (14th Edition) book pdf


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Introduction




In this article, we will give you an overview of Understanding Movies, a book written by Louis Giannetti, a professor emeritus of film and literature at Case Western Reserve University. We will tell you what the book is about, who the author is, and what are the main features of the book. We will also summarize each chapter of the book and provide some examples of films that illustrate the concepts discussed. Finally, we will answer some frequently asked questions about the book and how to get a pdf version of it.


What is Understanding Movies?




Understanding Movies is a textbook that aims to help students and general readers appreciate and analyze films from different genres, periods, and cultures. The book covers the basic elements of film form, such as photography, mise en scène, movement, editing, sound, acting, drama, story, writing, and ideology. It also introduces some theoretical approaches to film criticism, such as realism, formalism, genre theory, auteur theory, structuralism, psychoanalysis, feminism, and cultural studies. The book uses clear and concise language, vivid examples, and hundreds of illustrations to explain the technical and artistic aspects of cinema.


Who is the author?




Louis Giannetti is a professor emeritus of film and literature at Case Western Reserve University. He has taught courses in film analysis, literature, drama, and writing. He has also written several books on film and literature, such as Flashback: A Brief History of Film, Godard and Others: Essays on Film Form, Masters of the American Cinema, Understanding Movies, and Understanding Global Cinema. He has also published articles in journals such as The Quarterly Review of Film Studies, Literature/Film Quarterly, The Journal of Popular Film, The Journal of Popular Culture, The Journal of Narrative Technique, The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism, and The Hudson Review.


What are the main features of the book?




Understanding Movies has several features that make it an ideal textbook for students and instructors of film studies. Some of these features are:


  • The book is organized into three parts: Part One covers the basic elements of film form; Part Two covers the basic elements of film style; Part Three covers some theoretical approaches to film criticism.



  • The book includes a glossary of key terms at the end of each chapter, as well as a comprehensive index at the end of the book.



  • The book provides a list of suggested readings and websites for further exploration of each topic.



  • The book includes a CD-ROM that contains six interviews with film professionals, such as directors, cinematographers, editors, and sound designers.



  • The book is accompanied by a website that offers additional resources, such as quizzes, exercises, links, and videos.



  • The book is updated with new content on the latest cinematic trends and technologies, such as digital cinema, 3D, animation, and special effects.



  • The book is illustrated with hundreds of photos and diagrams that enhance the visual appeal and understanding of the concepts.



Chapter summary




In this section, we will briefly summarize each chapter of Understanding Movies and provide some examples of films that illustrate the concepts discussed. We will also highlight some of the key terms and questions that the author poses at the end of each chapter.


Chapter 1: Photography




This chapter introduces the basic elements of film photography, such as lens, film stock, exposure, lighting, filters, and color. It explains how these elements affect the mood, tone, and meaning of a film. It also discusses some of the stylistic choices that filmmakers make regarding photography, such as realism, expressionism, impressionism, surrealism, and abstraction. Some of the films that are analyzed in this chapter are Citizen Kane, Raging Bull, Apocalypse Now, Blade Runner, Amélie, and Sin City.


Some of the key terms in this chapter are: angle, aspect ratio, backlighting, chiaroscuro, contrast, depth of field, diffusion filter, focal length, focus, framing, iris shot, key light, long shot (LS), medium shot (MS), close-up (CU), extreme close-up (ECU), point-of-view shot (POV), rack focus, shot/reverse shot (S/RS), telephoto lens (long lens), wide-angle lens (short lens), zoom lens.


Some of the questions in this chapter are: How does photography create meaning in film? How does photography affect our perception of reality? How does photography express the filmmaker's vision? How does photography relate to other elements of film form and style?


Chapter 2: Mise en Scène




This chapter introduces the basic elements of mise en scène, which is a French term that means "placing on stage". It refers to everything that appears in front of the camera, such as setting, props, costumes, makeup, hairstyle, actors' movement and expression. It explains how these elements contribute to the narrative, theme, and mood of a film. It also discusses some of the stylistic choices that filmmakers make regarding mise en scène, such as realism, formalism, naturalism, expressionism. Some of the films that are analyzed in this chapter are The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Gone with the Wind, The Godfather, A Clockwork Orange, Star Wars, and The Lord of the Rings.


Some of the key terms in this chapter are: blocking (staging), composition (balance/symmetry/asymmetry), décor (set design), figure placement (foreground/background), iconography (symbolic meaning), open/closed forms (degree of realism/formalism), proxemic patterns (spatial relationships).


Some of the questions in this chapter are: How does mise en scène create meaning in film? How does mise en scène affect our emotional response to a film? How does mise en scène reflect the filmmaker's worldview? How does mise en scène relate to other elements of film form and style?


Chapter 3: Movement




This chapter introduces the basic elements of film movement, such as actors' movement (gesture/posture/facial expression), camera movement (pan/tilt/dolly/tracking/crane/zoom/handheld/steadicam), and mechanical distortions (slow motion/fast motion/reverse motion/animation). It explains how these elements create rhythm, pace, and dynamism in a film. It also discusses some of the stylistic choices that filmmakers make regarding movement, such as realism, formalism, continuity, and discontinuity. Some of the films that are analyzed in this chapter are Battleship Potemkin, The Graduate, Jaws, Raiders of the Lost Ark, , and The Matrix.


Some of the key terms in this chapter are: axis of action (180-degree rule), continuity editing (match cut/match on action/eyeline match), crosscutting (parallel editing), cutaway (insert), dissolve (lap dissolve), elliptical editing (jump cut), establishing shot, long take (sequence shot), montage (Soviet montage), shot duration (average shot length), shot transition (cut/fade/wipe), spatial continuity (screen direction), temporal continuity (order/duration/frequency).


Some of the questions in this chapter are: How does movement create meaning in film? How does movement affect our sense of time and space in film? How does movement express the filmmaker's style and attitude? How does movement relate to other elements of film form and style?


Chapter 4: Editing




This chapter introduces the basic elements of film editing, which is the process of selecting and arranging shots to create a coherent and effective film. It explains how editing affects the narrative, theme, and mood of a film. It also discusses some of the stylistic choices that filmmakers make regarding editing, such as continuity editing, discontinuity editing, classical cutting, thematic cutting, and rhythmic cutting. Some of the films that are analyzed in this chapter are Bicycle Thieves, Bonnie and Clyde, The Conversation, Rashomon, Breathless, and Memento.


Some of the key terms in this chapter are: analytical editing (shot/reverse shot/crosscutting/eyeline match/reaction shot/point-of-view shot), associative editing (intellectual montage/thematic montage/symbolic montage), classical cutting (invisible editing/continuity editing), constructive editing (Kuleshov effect/180-degree rule/axis of action/spatial continuity/temporal continuity), discontinuity editing (jump cut/match cut/graphic match/sound bridge/flashback/flashforward/dream sequence/fantasy sequence), rhythmic cutting (pace/tempo/rhythm).


Some of the questions in this chapter are: How does editing create meaning in film? How does editing affect our perception and cognition of film? How does editing express the filmmaker's purpose and perspective? How does editing relate to other elements of film form and style?


Chapter 5: Sound




This chapter introduces the basic elements of film sound, such as dialogue, music, sound effects, silence, and noise. It explains how sound affects the narrative, theme, and mood of a film. It also discusses some of the stylistic choices that filmmakers make regarding sound, such as diegetic/non-diegetic sound, synchronous/asynchronous sound, onscreen/offscreen sound, direct/indirect sound, internal/external sound, subjective/objective sound, and contrapuntal sound. Some of the films that are analyzed in this chapter are Singin' in the Rain, Psycho, The Conversation, The Godfather, Star Wars, and The Silence of the Lambs.


Some of the key terms in this chapter are: ambient sound (background sound/atmosphere), dialogue overlap (L-cut/J-cut), dubbing (looping/post-synchronization), fidelity (faithfulness/congruence), Foley artist (sound effects artist), leitmotif (recurring musical theme), Mickey Mousing (synchronized music/sound effects), mixing (sound balance/sound level/sound perspective), voice-over narration (offscreen narration/commentary).


Some of the questions in this chapter are: How does sound create meaning in film? How does sound affect our emotional response to film? How does sound express the filmmaker's tone and mood? How does sound relate to other elements of film form and style?


Chapter 6: Acting




This chapter introduces the basic elements of film acting, such as casting, performance, characterization, star persona, and screen presence. It explains how acting affects the narrative, theme, and mood of a film. It also discusses some of the stylistic choices that filmmakers make regarding acting, such as realism, formalism, naturalism, expressionism, method acting, and improvisation. Some of the films that are analyzed in this chapter are The Passion of Joan of Arc, On the Waterfront, A Streetcar Named Desire, The Graduate, Taxi Driver, and The King's Speech.


Some of the key terms in this chapter are: character actor (supporting actor), ensemble acting (group acting), leading actor (star actor), method acting (Stanislavski system), nonprofessional actor (amateur actor), personality actor (typecasting), screen test (audition), star system (star power/star image/star vehicle).


Some of the questions in this chapter are: How does acting create meaning in film? How does acting affect our identification and empathy with film characters? How does acting express the filmmaker's vision and message? How does acting relate to other elements of film form and style?


Chapter 7: Drama




This chapter introduces the basic elements of film drama, such as plot, story, character, conflict, theme, genre, and style. It explains how drama affects the narrative, theme, and mood of a film. It also discusses some of the stylistic choices that filmmakers make regarding drama, such as realism, formalism, naturalism, expressionism, tragedy, comedy, melodrama, and satire. Some of the films that are analyzed in this chapter are Oedipus Rex, Hamlet, Dr. Strangelove, Chinatown, Annie Hall, and Do the Right Thing.


Some of the key terms in this chapter are: catharsis (emotional purification), climax (turning point/crisis), denouement (resolution/falling action), exposition (background information/setting the scene), genre (type/category/convention), plot (structure/framework/sequence of events), story (content/meaning/theme), subplot (secondary plot/parallel plot), suspense (anticipation/uncertainty).


Some of the questions in this chapter are: How does drama create meaning in film? How does drama affect our involvement and interest in film? How does drama express the filmmaker's worldview and values? How does drama relate to other elements of film form and style?


Chapter 8: Story




This chapter introduces the basic elements of film story, such as narrative, narration, point of view, focalization, and diegesis. It explains how story affects the narrative, theme, and mood of a film. It also discusses some of the stylistic choices that filmmakers make regarding story, such as linear/nonlinear story, chronological/anachronical story, single/multiple story, objective/subjective story, and omniscient/restricted story. Some of the films that are analyzed in this chapter are Citizen Kane, Rashomon, Pulp Fiction, Memento, The Usual Suspects, and The Sixth Sense.


Some of the key terms in this chapter are: diegesis (story world/fictional world), fabula (story/content/meaning/theme), focalization (perspective/angle/vision), narration (storytelling/mode/discourse), narrative (plot/structure/framework/sequence of events), narrator (storyteller/voice/source), point of view (POV) (position/stance/attitude), sjuzhet (plot/structure/framework/sequence of events).


Some of the questions in this chapter are: How does story create meaning in film? How does story affect our comprehension and interpretation of film? How does story express the filmmaker's purpose and perspective? How does story relate to other elements of film form and style?


Chapter 9: Writing




This chapter introduces the basic elements of film writing, such as screenplay, script, dialogue, subtext, voice-over, and adaptation. It explains how writing affects the narrative, theme, and mood of a film. It also discusses some of the stylistic choices that filmmakers make regarding writing, such as realism, formalism, naturalism, expressionism, literary writing, and cinematic writing. Some of the films that are analyzed in this chapter are Casablanca, Sunset Boulevard, The Godfather, Annie Hall, The Social Network, and Brokeback Mountain.


/polisher), subtext (underlying meaning/implication/inference), voice-over (offscreen narration/commentary).


Some of the questions in this chapter are: How does writing create meaning in film? How does writing affect our engagement and enjoyment of film? How does writing express the filmmaker's style and skill? How does writing relate to other elements of film form and style?


Chapter 10: Ideology




This chapter introduces the basic elements of film ideology, which is a set of beliefs, values, and assumptions that shape our perception and interpretation of reality. It explains how ideology affects the narrative, theme, and mood of a film. It also discusses some of the theoretical approaches to film ideology, such as realism, formalism, genre theory, auteur theory, structuralism, psychoanalysis, feminism, and cultural studies. Some of the films that are analyzed in this chapter are The Birth of a Nation, Battleship Potemkin, The Searchers, Vertigo, Alien, and Do the Right Thing.


Some of the key terms in this chapter are: auteur theory (author theory/personal vision/signature style), cultural studies (social context/cultural diversity/ideological critique), feminism (gender equality/women's rights/female representation), formalism (form/style/technique), genre theory (type/category/convention), psychoanalysis (unconscious/desire/fantasy), realism (reality/truth/authenticity), structuralism (structure/system/code).


Some of the questions in this chapter are: How does ideology create meaning in film? How does ideology affect our attitude and evaluation of film? How does ideology express the filmmaker's worldview and values? How does ideology relate to other elements of film form and style?


Conclusion




In conclusion, Understanding Movies is a comprehensive and insightful textbook that covers the basic elements of film form and style. It helps students and general readers appreciate and analyze films from different genres, periods, and cultures. It also introduces some theoretical approaches to film criticism and ideology. The book is written in a clear and concise language, illustrated with hundreds of photos and diagrams, and updated with new content on the latest cinematic trends and technologies. The book also includes a glossary of key terms, a list of suggested readings and websites, a CD-ROM with interviews with film professionals, and a website with additional resources. If you are looking for a book that will help you understand movies better, you might want to check out Understanding Movies.


FAQs




Here are some frequently asked questions about Understanding Movies:


  • Who is the target audience of Understanding Movies?The target audience of Understanding Movies is mainly students and instructors of film studies courses. However, the book can also be useful for general readers who are interested in learning more about the art and craft of filmmaking.



  • What is the difference between the 14th edition and the previous editions of Understanding Movies?The 14th edition of Understanding Movies has some new features that make it more up-to-date and relevant for today's readers. Some of these features are: new content on digital cinema, 3D, animation, and special effects; new examples of films from different countries and cultures; new interviews with film professionals on the CD-ROM; new exercises and quizzes on the website.



  • How can I get a pdf version of Understanding Movies?You can get a pdf version of Understanding Movies by purchasing an eTextbook from Pearson or other online platforms. You can also rent or buy a print version of the book from Pearson or other online retailers.



How can I use Understanding Movies as a textbook for my film studies course?You can use Understanding Movies as a textbook for your film studies course by following the suggested syllabus and lesson plans provided by Pearson on their website. You can also customize your own syllabus and lesson plans based on your course objectives and preferences. You c


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