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Lauren Marie
Lauren Marie

Counter Strike Source Voice Codec [2021]


Having this list of messages and their definitions enabled us to gain insights into what kind of data is sent between the client and server. However, we still had no idea in which order messages would be sent and what kind of values were expected. For example, we knew that a message exists to initialize a voice message with some codec, but we had no idea which codecs are supported by CS:GO.




Counter Strike Source Voice Codec


Download File: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Furluso.com%2F2ucHBp&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw2gr1aDnrip19zDhAFhHBHh



CHANGES:- Changed M4A1-S ammo count to match current CS:GO build (clip size: 20, reserve: 80)- Upgraded code compile toolset to VS2015, which might affect people running VERY old versions of Windows- Upgraded font renderer from default Windows font renderer to FreeType(custom fonts may use "oldrenderer" flag to use old renderer, see c4panel.res for an example)- Updated loser money bonus behaviour to match CS:GO (added mp_consecutive_loss_max and mp_consecutive_loss_aversion commands)- Money received in current round can now only be spent next round- Bomb logic now runs every tick when it's being defused or close to exploding- Tracers now fire starting from the first bullet, which makes them visible with sv_infinite_ammo 1- Made viewmodel recoil work exactly like in CS:GO- fov_cs_debug now accepts floating point values- Player list header in scoreboard will now always render(previously it was only rendered if there were any players in-game for casual modes or any CT players in-game for regular modes)- Death notice now uses SVG instead of fonts to render icons- voice_enable 0 will no longer deinitialize voice codec, voice_system_enable is added instead- Rate-limited commands can now only be fired once in 1.0 seconds instead of 0.3 seconds (for example: jointeam, joinclass, spectate)- Slightly updated old and CT Jumpsuit agent icons (icons generated in CS:GO)- More optimizations


Handbrake allows you to change audio encoding (codec type) from a source audio track. It supports ACC, HE-ACC, ACC pass-thru, AC3, E-AC3, and MP3 audio codecs. For example, Handbrake can take the AC3 audio track from a DVD or BluRay and transcode it to an AAC for mobile devices. Additionally, you can also change the sound mixdown (Stereo, Mono, etc), sample rate, bitrate, and adjust Gain and DRC (Dynamic Range Compression) from the same toolbar.


CHANGES:- Changed M4A1-S ammo count to match current CS:GO build (clip size: 20, reserve: 80)- Upgraded code compile toolset to VS2015, which might affect people running VERY old versions of Windows- Upgraded font renderer from default Windows font renderer to FreeType (custom fonts may use "oldrenderer" flag to use old renderer, see c4panel.res for an example)- Updated loser money bonus behaviour to match CS:GO (added mp_consecutive_loss_max and mp_consecutive_loss_aversion commands)- Money received in current round can now only be spent next round- Bomb logic now runs every tick when it's being defused or close to exploding- Tracers now fire starting from the first bullet, which makes them visible with sv_infinite_ammo 1- Made viewmodel recoil work exactly like in CS:GO- fov_cs_debug now accepts floating point values- Player list header in scoreboard will now always render (previously it was only rendered if there were any players in-game for casual modes or any CT players in-game for regular modes)- Death notice now uses SVG instead of fonts to render icons- voice_enable 0 will no longer deinitialize voice codec, voice_system_enable is added instead- Rate-limited commands can now only be fired once in 1.0 seconds instead of 0.3 seconds (for example: jointeam, joinclass, spectate)- Slightly updated old and CT Jumpsuit agent icons (icons generated in CS:GO)- More optimizations


The increased complexity of the network, encryption of services, proprietary codecs/clients and even delivery protocols, and the need to minimize network operational costs, calls for highly evolved testing techniques. These techniques need to be easily adaptable to a diverse set of services and applications and must provide a trustful user experience evaluation. The metrics assessed need to cover familiar services/applications (e.g. voice, audio, video) as well as emerging ones (e.g. e-gaming, remote drone control) which require new, previously untested quality metrics such user interactivity.


1) Generic OTT voice/video clients Testing all mobile OTT voice and video streaming services/applications is practically impossible. This is due to the large number and variety of mobile OTT applications, multiple different platforms and device-based operating systems (OS), as well as proprietary codecs and clients, and error concealment schemes. Perhaps the most challenging aspect, however, is the level of encryption within these applications, which in many cases is device OS dependent as well as continuously, and even dynamically changing.


Infovista offers a generic OTT voice client solution with our user experience voice quality machine learning based predictor sQLEAR (a.k.a ITU-T P.565.1). The generic OTT voice client was designed based on one of the most used OTT voice applications, WhatsApp, which has the advantage of using an open-source codec (OPUS) and jitter buffer (PJSIP). A thorough analysis of real WhatsApp application traffic patterns and jitter buffer handling across different network conditions, ranging from very poor to excellent, was used to determine the generic OTT voice client KPI configuration for the codec (e.g. encoder expected packet loss, packet loss concealment scheme) and jitter buffer (e.g. packet size, mode, jitter size). Following this, an extensive validation of the generic OTT voice client was performed by simultaneously running WhatsApp and the generic voice application in a broad range of network conditions. Comparing the voice quality scores showed a statistically significant similarity between the two. To learn more about sQLEAR please visit the Infovista Resource Library for some white papers on the subject.


2) Generic OTT service/application traffic patterns and user interactivity The ability of 5G to deliver very high bandwidth and very low latency provides the foundations for a new category of highly interactive services/applications such as mobile cloud gaming and remote drone control, for which testing of interactivity becomes critical. However, these services/applications come in an even larger variety and diversity of genres, flavors and application use cases than their OTT voice/video counterparts. This again necessitates a generic testing approach.


The NPRM proposed in 402.4 to address the size, font, and contrast requirements for characters displayed on a screen. We received comments from a range of stakeholders (ICT trade associations and companies, two state/local, a coalition of disability rights organizations and an academic research institution). Commenters from industry objected to the size and contrast requirements as being vague and needing additional explanation. On the other hand, commenters from the state agencies, disability advocacy organizations, and academia supported the provision as being useful in providing criteria for a more accessible font style and size. The disability advocacy organizations wanted an additional requirement to specify a font size in at least one mode where ICT did not have a screen enlargement feature. We have declined to change the provision (final 402.4). The language of the provision is derived from 707.7.2 in the ADA and ABA Accessibility Guidelines. This language has proven over time to strike a fair balance as a minimum standard that is technically feasible for a broad range of devices. While the Board agrees that a more specific contrast requirement would be beneficial, there is not yet an industry consensus standard for measuring contrast as delivered. We considered the metric for contrast as specified by WCAG 2.0 Level AA Success Criterion 1.4.3 but determined that it is inapplicable here, since it only applies to source content and is not appropriate for displays, as addressed in this provision.


The NPRM contained a lengthy section addressing accessibility features of operable parts. We received several comments from industry (ICT trade association and an ICT company) requesting that we delete the provision requiring that keys and controls contrast visually from background surfaces, (proposed 407.2) as being imprecise and incapable of being measured. We have declined to delete this requirement because contrast on controls and keys is an important feature in providing access to the labels on the keys for persons with low vision. The language of the provision is derived from 707.7.2 in the ADA and ABA Accessibility Guidelines. The language has proven to strike a fair balance as a minimum standard and being technically feasible for a broad range of devices. While the Board would prefer to have a more specific contrast requirement, there is not yet an industry consensus standard for measuring contrast as delivered. The metric for contrast as specified by WCAG 2.0 Level AA Success Criterion 1.4.3 is inapplicable here, since it only applies to source content and is not appropriate for displays, as addressed in this provision. Accordingly, we have retained the provision without change from the proposed rule (proposed 407.2; final 407.2).


None of the amateur digital voice codecs are encrypted. It used to be that some of them were not fully disclosed. It turns out that the AMBE chip algorithm was disclosed as part of adopting it for a system commonly used by fire and police called APCO 25.


Proprietary codecs are absolutely against the spirit of what amateur radio is, which is why we should develop a commercially-viable open-source standard that could be used not only in amateur radio but also for commercial radio transmissions. This means that it must have the potential to encrypt the transmissions (as this is allowable for commercial radio traffic). Otherwise, any standard will wither and die.


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